Another Book Club for Kids Podcast featuring Eliot-Hine: 7th graders & Author Alan Silberberg of Milo: Sticky Notes & Brain Freeze

Eliot-Hine 7th graders interview and discuss the book “Milo: Sticky Notes & Brain Freeze” with author and illustrator Alan Silberberg. This book covers a tale of 7th grade angst and dealing with the loss of a parent. Check out the podcast, episode 70 on Kitty Felde’s Bookclub for Kids Podcast

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Eliot-Hine MS 7th graders interviews for Kitty Felde’s Bookclub for Kids Podcast.

 

Author Alan Silberberg on left and actor Joshua Malina (“West Wing,” “Scandal,” the “West Wing Weekly” podcast) on right, is the celebrity reader. 

Eliot Hine

Want to check out other podcast Eliot-Hine MS has done? Click here for last year’s podcast on the book “Ungifted” by Gordon Korman.

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Eliot-Hine’s Junk Art Club: Wins Storm Drain Contest with Michael Jackson Design!

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A few members of the Junk Art Club (7th graders) with their completed storm drain design!

The storm drains around Eliot-Hine and Eastern High School recently got a face lift! Last fall, the Anacostia Watershed Society put out a call for designs to paint storm drains around the city. Eliot-Hine’s Junk Art Club was one of 20 winners chosen from more than 140 designs submitted! Come check out their winning piece directly across the street from the front doors of Eliot-Hine on Constitution Avenue. There are seven other winning designs on storm drains near Eliot-Hine MS and Eastern HS. All 20 winning designs can be seen here.

The mural designs were chosen based on their connection to the Anacostia River, the local community, and watershed protection issues. The Junk Art Club’s design was based on the Michael Jackson song Man in the Mirror. The design is painted on a blue background that represents the Anacostia River.  A black silhouette of Michael Jackson looks down on the storm drain manhole cover that is painted a metallic silver. The words “I’m starting with the man in the mirror.  I’m asking him to change his ways.  Michael Jackson,” are written in black.

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Closer look at the Michael Jackson inspired storm drain, encouraging others to “change his ways” from the Man in the Mirror

The Junk Art Club chose their design because virtually all of the litter that finds its way into the Anacostia River comes from people littering.  Preventing littering from entering storm sewers is one of the most effective ways to reduce the trash found in the Anacostia River.  The Michael Jackson song Man in the Mirror asks people to look “in the mirror” at what they do with waste once they have finished using, e.g., a bottle or a candy wrapper, and if they do litter it encourages them to “change their ways.” Will you join Eliot-Hine in changing your ways and creating a #trashfreedc?

The Junk Art Club received a $750 stipend from the Anacostia Watershed Society for their artwork, and donated the stipend to the Eliot-Hine Parent Teacher Organization at their December 2017 meeting. Thank you to Eliot-Hine’s environmentally conscious and community service driven students paving the way to a better place for all of us!

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Junk Art Club donates stipend to Eliot-Hine’s PTO. Heather Schoell, PTO President, pictured here with Elizabeth, 7th grader from the Junk Art Club.

 

Eliot-Hine MS Principal Meet & Greet: Sundaes on Monday

Eliot-Hine Middle School’s new principal, Eugenia Young, is hosting a Meet & Greet on Monday, July 31. The event will be held from 12:00-2:00 PM at Eliot Hine Middle School. Ice cream will be served! We will also be enrolling students for the upcoming 2017-2018 school year. Come out and meet Principal Young and enjoy a yummy sundae!Sundae on Monday-SM (3) (1)-page-001

Eliot-Hine Staff Feature: Mr. Richardson, 6th & 7th World Cultures & Geography

 

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Mr. Richardson on left with Ambassador of Malta, Clive Agius
  • What experiences led you to where you are in education today? In college I was president of the Black Student Union and noticed their recruitment of inner city students to Towson University were lacking. This bothered me and I remember meeting with the president of my university about this. Later, the more I found out there was a stipulation of learning habits of inner city youth. I was headed to law school to be a civil rights lawyer, even had already taken the LSAT, but then decided to teach instead. I wanted prove it wasn’t the students, but the lack of opportunities they were provided. I knew these students were also capable.
  • How long have you been teaching at Eliot-Hine or how long have you been a teacher? This is my 14th year, but first year at Eliot-Hine MS.
  • Can you tell us about an activity your students have done in your class this year? Our 6th graders are partnered with the Ambassador of Malta as part of the DCPS Embassy Adoption Program group. Ambassador Clive Agius is such a humble person. The students get a fun opportunity to feature their talents. We had group project presentations for the Ambassador.  We also hosted a welcome presentation which included banners featuring our students art skills, dance/cheer infusing Malta and US styles. One student created a Malta US trivia game! Our students organized the whole event!
  • How would you describe Eliot-Hine students? They are such good kids. They have great potential. We must commit to continuously provide opportunities and tools for them to reach their maximum potential!
  • This is Eliot-Hine’s first full year as an IB MS. How does this IB program shape your teaching? I always say that I would like my students to become world citizens, in addition to being a citizen of DC. This is perfectly aligned with the IB framework. Inquiry is a huge part of my class. I like to challenge students to think beyond Washington DC or to reflect on their hometown.
  • What is your favorite event/activity/aspect of Eliot-Hine? I like when we have school-wide events and field trips. We watched the 8th graders do a masterful job in the Black History Month program, the Ambassador of Malta has visited twice for a school visit, and he hosted us at recently where students prepared figolli, a traditional Maltese Easter dessert. (See photos below)
  • What is something most people do not know about Eliot-Hine? We have GREAT kids! Sometimes I mention where I teach and there is judgment. They are wrong, OUR STUDENTS ARE GREAT. We also have such a good community of teachers.
  • Describe Eliot-Hine in one word Potential! Looking at the proximity of the school to the seat of our national government and being in DC, there is so much they can learn.
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6th graders with Ambassador Agius
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Students preparing figolli, a traditional Maltese Easter dessert

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Connecting art & emotional responses: Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors field trip

Last week, Ms. Mills took a group of students on a field trip to see Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors exhibit at the Hirschhorn Museum. Artist Yayoi Kusama’s avant-garde pieces are known for their ability to evoke various emotional responses based on her unconventional use of space, color, light and reflection. In her Infinity Mirrors exhibit, Kusama created six rooms of wonder on the beauty, stereotypes and evolution of the human condition. Students viewed the rooms as well as her earlier creations such as “Works on Paper.” Students then analyzes the six rooms and critically discuss Kusama’s perspective on the “incredible beauty of humanity.” Check out photos from their day below:

If you are interested in this exhibit, information on their free timed-passes is here. 

Eliot-Hine Staff Feature: Ms. Harrington, 8th Grade Physical Science

 

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Ms. Harrington, 8th grade Physical Science teacher
  • Where are you from and what experiences led you to where you are in education today? I am from this area and went to Virginia Tech. After college, I came back home and have been teaching at Eliot-Hine ever since. My mentor is my 9th grade biology teacher. She is remarkable, made science fun, and we still have relationship to this day! Relating lessons to the real world made her class so interesting. That is what I try to do in my classroom: connect and make every moment count
  • How long have you been teaching at EH? Six years. I started my teaching career here at Eliot-Hine.
  • How would you describe Eliot-Hine students? Inquisitive. They are always exploring, asking questions, seeking answers, and constantly learning. They love being here! They are appreciated and very loved in this safe space.
  • Share something about Eliot-Hine staff: No teacher or classroom here is alike. You will find teachers here come from such diverse backgrounds- those with a doctorate degree or some seeking teaching as a career change, etc. All our various attributes bring something different to the classroom.
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    Science learning profiles

    This is Eliot-Hine’s first full year as an IB MS. How does this IB framework shape your teaching? We really emphasize the IB learner profiles. These are attributes I would like them to have when they leave my class. A test does not strictly define capability. We focus a lot on the whole student and project-based learning. They’re so creative and excel when they’re asked to apply what they’ve learned. You’ll see a lot more discussion-based classes here. Also debates that challenge their mindset and expose them to various ways of thinking about something.

  • What are some new Science initiatives at Eliot-Hine this year? We have new lab spaces and equipment! There is a grow lab (an indoor gardening station) in the back of the 7th grade Life Science classroom. We also recently created a pollinator garden to help preserve the health of bees, butterflies, birds, and other pollinators.
  • What is something people do not know about Eliot-Hine? We are a Flamboyan Family Engagement Partnership School. Flamboyan Foundation works with four DCPS schools as Middle School Family Engagement Partners to implement high impact family engagement strategies that build strong relationships and engage families as partners in their student’s academic success. This allows us to do a lot home visits. We also have student-led conferences and goal setting is also very student-driven.
  • Describe Eliot-Hine in one word. Change. Middle school years are the years of transformation. We help with the precious transition into becoming  a middle school student and build up their character for their transition into high school. Our students become very resilient and acquire many life skills to help them adapt to change.

Stop by Eliot-Hine to check out their neat pollinator garden or meet passionate staff like Ms. Harrington! We will feature more staff members and their pollinator garden in the coming weeks. 

 

 

Eliot-Hine’s Award-winning Junk Art Club!

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Eliot-Hine is full of fun and innovative extracurriculars. Recently the Junk Art Club was selected as a winner of the Office of the State Superintendent for Education (OSSE) Health and Wellness Award. The Junk Art Club won this $500 award for their efforts to create art out of materials that would normally be considered trash. The club members have created a map of the United States out of cereal boxes and are currently working on a project to recreate one of the panels from the Jacob Lawrence Migration Series out of bottle caps.

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Below is an update from their recent adventure with the Anacostia Watershed Society:

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Members of the Junk Art Club spent a day with the Anacostia Watershed Society collecting and sorting trash from the River Terrace Trash Trap. Trash traps are set up along the Anacostia River to prevent trash in storm water sewer outflows from entering the river. In addition to keeping trash out of the river, the students learned the trash traps provide valuable information to policy makers. Data gathered from the trash traps were important pieces of information that led to the five-cent fee on plastic bags, and the recent ban on Styrofoam containers in the District.  The students learned that the five-cent fee on plastic bags led to a significant reduction in plastic bags found in the river. Today the trash traps along the river are collecting primarily plastic and glass beverage containers.

Looking forward to more things the Junk Art Club creates and positive impact they have on the environment!