Principal Magrino Meet & Greet: 7/30, 5:30 PM at Hill Center

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Join us next week for Principal Magrino’s meet and greet at the Hill Center. In addition to meeting Principal Magrino and her team, you can check out Eliot-Hine students’ Junk Art Club exhibit in the Young Artist Gallery. Come with any questions you may have!

Marlene Magrino

  • Where: Hill Center
  • Address: 921 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, Washington, DC 20003
  • Time: 5:30 PM
  • Questions?: Call the main office at 202-399-5380 or email Ophelia.Morgan@dc.gov

You can also check out Principal Magrino’s short bio here.

 

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Eliot-Hine’s Junk Art Club Summer Exhibit at Hill Center’s Young Artists Gallery

Content and photos for this blog post provided by Eliot-Hine MS parent, Suzanne Wells. She also leads the Junk Art Club at Eliot-Hine MS! 

This summer, Eliot-Hine’s Junk Art Club is having an exhibit of its art work at the Hill Center in the Young Artists Gallery.  The exhibit will be on display through the end of August. The Junk Art Club is an afterschool activity that was started two years ago. Club members hope visitors to One Person’s Trash is a Student’s Art will be inspired to find ways to reduce waste, and think about how something might be reused before it is thrown in the trash. The Hill Center is located at 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. The Young Artists Gallery is on the ground floor, east of the main staircase. Eliot-Hine MS will also host a new principal meet and greet at the Hill Center on Monday, 7/30 at 5:30 PM.

Last year, the students created a bottle cap reproduction of a Jacob Lawrence painting from his Migration Series (Panel #58 In the North the African American had more education opportunities). Club members saved bottle caps from home, and scored a big bag of them from the Indian restaurant, Indigo. In the words of 7th grader Malia Weedon,  “I care about the environment, and this is a fun way to help the environment.  Projects tend to be more inventive when you use trash.  When you work with trash you work with what you find, and you have to be creative with how you use it.”

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Eliot-Hine MS students transform bottle caps to a Jacob Lawrence painting from his Migration Series 

The discovery of a cache of Ikea bed slats set out for garbage inspired an “eye project” that was modeled after a community art project done at North Park University in Chicago. Students paired up to paint each other’s eyes on the slats, creating mini-portraits. Sixth grader Annika Crawford observed: “I decided to be in the Junk Art Club because I like art.  Art is my imagination.  I take creations from my mind, and put them on paper.  The eye project was great because you got to look at different people, and draw them the way you see them.”

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Example of Eliot-Hine MS student’s eye painting on re-purposed bed slats

Yet another use of found materials is the collection of painted hubcaps, originally gleaned from gutters and sidewalks on Capitol Hill. Rust-Oleum spray paint was used as a base coat on the hubcaps, and the students painted with a liquid metal acrylic paint on top of the base coat.

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Re-purposed hub caps painted by Eliot-Hine MS students
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Eliot-Hine MS student artists at work! 

Want to learn more about Eliot-Hine’s Junk Art Club? Check out these previous posts:

Eliot-Hine: History Inspires Role Models for 7th Graders

Eliot-Hine MS 7th grade students capped off their recent English Language Arts cornerstone unit, My Warrior Self, with a trip to the Newseum to see the civil rights exhibit about the tumultuous events leading up to 1968, when Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. Cornerstones are powerful lessons that students engage in through the DCPS units of study. This particular cornerstone unit involved reading the memoir Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Pattillo Beals, exploring what makes a warrior and how their own definition has shifted, preparing a display about a “warrior” they know, and visiting the civil rights exhibit at the Newseum.

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Eliot-Hine 7th graders with their personal warrior, Martin Luther King Jr.

In Warriors Don’t Cry, the 7th graders learned about the nine teenagers who were chosen to integrate Little Rock’s Central High School in 1957.  The memoir describes the dignity and courage the nine teenagers showed throughout their year at Central High School when they were on the front lines of the efforts to integrate our nations’ schools.  To relate the book to their own lives, the students chose a “warrior” they know, and prepared a display board describing how their “warrior” took a stand to fight for what is right.  At the Newseum, the students watched and discussed a documentary about how civil rights activists harnessed the power of the news media to bring about social change.  All of the activities in this unit are intended to provide the students with insights about how to be resilient, and persevere through inevitable challenges they will face in life.

We love to see Eliot-Hine students making real-world connections through engaging in rigorous content! To learn more about the DCPS Cornerstones Initiative, check out their website which includes libraries of examples for each subject,

Eliot-Hine International Faire: Bringing the World to Capitol Hill

Eliot-Hine hosted a vibrant International Faire on Friday, June 2 open to the community. This event aimed to present students with a global perspective and share more about their new International Baccalaureate framework. There were fun activities such as temporary henna tattoos, Chinese calligraphy, and Arabic script writing. There were also stations featuring fun books and apps focusing on other countries and cultures like Tutu’s storybooks and an Argentinian tango demonstration. Students and families also learned about programs within Eliot-Hine that pushes a global perspective, such as the Model UN program and the DC Global Education’s Embassy Adoption Program. Thank you for such a beautiful event!

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Jump-start June with Eliot-Hine’s International Faire: Fri., 6/2 at 5 PM

Eliot-Hine MS 2017 International Faire Flyer

This family-friendly and educational event is next Friday, June 2nd. Join us for a very fun night of cultural dance performances, play games from other countries, get a henna tattoo, taste delicious international cuisine, and more. All are invited to join us!

Any questions can be directed to eliothinepto@gmail.com.

Eliot-Hine MS is located at 1830 Constitution Ave. NE, Washington DC, 20002. The closest metro stop is Stadium-Armory and street parking is available.

Come Enroll at Eliot-Hine for SY17-18!

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This past weekend Eiot-Hine hosted an event to kick off enrollment for School Year 2017-2018. Families enrolled their students while everyone planted peas and participated in a Kusama inspired painting project from a field trip students took to the Hirschhorn Museum earlier. Check out the photos from the event below and stop by Eliot-Hine to see the new artwork!

If you missed this event, below are other opportunities you can come enroll your student or learn more about Eliot-Hine in person. Please call the main office if you have any questions about enrollment: 202-939-5380.

  • April 8, Saturday, 9 – 11 AM: Finishing the pollinator garden installation!
  • April 12, Wednesday 5:30-8 PM: PTO meeting
  • May 10, Wednesday, 5:30- 8 PM: PTO meeting
  • May 13, Saturday, 9 AM – 12 PM: Enrollment Fair
  • May 19, Friday, 12 – 7 PM: Parent Teacher Conference Day
  • June 2, Friday, 5:30 -8 PM: International Night Expo
  • June 6, Tuesday, 5 – 7 PM: Enrollment Fair

Connecting art & emotional responses: Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors field trip

Last week, Ms. Mills took a group of students on a field trip to see Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors exhibit at the Hirschhorn Museum. Artist Yayoi Kusama’s avant-garde pieces are known for their ability to evoke various emotional responses based on her unconventional use of space, color, light and reflection. In her Infinity Mirrors exhibit, Kusama created six rooms of wonder on the beauty, stereotypes and evolution of the human condition. Students viewed the rooms as well as her earlier creations such as “Works on Paper.” Students then analyzes the six rooms and critically discuss Kusama’s perspective on the “incredible beauty of humanity.” Check out photos from their day below:

If you are interested in this exhibit, information on their free timed-passes is here.